Commodities Are Screaming Trouble But the Fed Isn’t Listening

Courtesy of Pam Martens.

SPDR S&P Metals & Mining Exchange Traded Fund (Red), Freeport-McMoRan (Blue), and BHP Billiton (Yellow) Charts for Past Year

SPDR S&P Metals & Mining Exchange Traded Fund (Red), Freeport-McMoRan (Blue), and BHP Billiton (Orange) Charts for Past Year

 

By Pam Martens and Russ Martens: July 31, 2015 

The commodities slump has accelerated this past month with gold now trading at five-year lows and the U.S. crude benchmark, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), down 19 percent in just the past month, 49 percent on the year, and 57 percent in the past two years. In early morning trade, WTI is at $47.82 versus $110 two years ago.

Minutes of the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meeting on December 16 and 17 reveal that the Fed was expecting an upturn in oil prices this year, writing: “…inflation was projected to reach the Committee’s objective over time, with longer-run inflation expectations assumed to remain stable, prices of energy and non-oil imports forecast to begin rising next year, and slack in labor and product markets anticipated to diminish slowly.”

CNN Money is reporting this morning that major iron ore or metals exporting countries like Peru (copper), Chile (copper), South Africa (iron ore and gold), Australia (iron ore and gold), Brazil (iron ore), Zambia (copper), and Democratic Republic of the Congo (metals and crude oil) are experiencing a serious economic impact from the plunge in commodity prices over the past year.

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